AfCiC on Child Labour

Every year on 12th, the world celebrates World Day against Child Labour. The holiday was first launched in 2002 by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the aim of raising awareness and activism to prevent child labour.

Child Labour is defined as any situation where a child provides labour in exchange for payment. The Employment Act of 2007 defines a child in Kenya as a person below the age of 18 years. The Act in Section 56 makes it illegal to employ a child below the age of 13. The Children Act No.8 of 2001 in S10 provides that every child is to be protected from economic exploitation, any work that interferes with their education or is harmful to their health or development and recruitment to hostilities and armed conflict. In fact Section 64 declares an offence for any person who employs, engages or uses a child in an industrial undertaking and sets a maximum fine of Kshs 200,000 or one year imprisonment or both.

Nonetheless, this does not take away from the fact that the state of living of some children dictates that they take up employment for the sake of their own livelihood and that if their families. With that in mind, several organizations work with the aim of assisting such children and protecting them from exploitation such as the Action for Children Economic Empowerment Programme for working children which is dedicated to giving members of the society the tools to support themselves economically. The organization focuses on children who are unable to go to secondary school and instead require employment to support their livelihood.

The scheme assists the children in acquiring apprenticeship training and giving the children vocational and life skills. In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, Kenya has witnessed massive economic decline. This as a result of measures taken by the government inspired by the need to curb the spread of the virus. The measures include social distancing orders, curfews and even partial lockdowns in some areas all of which directly affect grasroot businesses. This coupled with the substantive decline in numbers of customers frequenting the businesses births pressure on the owners of the establishments. This has largely dampened the organization’s efforts as they now face a shortage of options for placement of the children and also a number of the already working children having to forfeit work for their safety.

 The overhanging danger posed by this is disillusionment among the children who had hopes of a noble means to provide for their basic needs. Frustrated, they may resort to street life or crime to sustain them.

AfCiC provides a platform for working children within Thika sub-county to articulate their views about child labour via formation of a Thika Children Advisory Council (CAC) that recently presented their views about child labor at the 30th anniversary of  the United Nations Convention of Children Rights whose celebrations in Kenya were held at the Multimedia University and Kenyatta International Conference Council (KICC) in November 2019. In addition, the Thika Children Advisory Council presented its views for legislative consideration to the Thika Town constituency Member of Parliament Wainaina Wa Jungle in 2019. Alongside this,  the Thika Children Advisory Council has been instrumental in educating their peers about child labour and sensitizing them on the drawbacks of the same and measures that they can take to protect themselves.

Every year on 12th, the world celebrates World Day against Child Labour. The holiday was first launched in 2002 by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the aim of raising awareness and activism to prevent child labour.

Child Labour is defined as any situation where a child provides labour in exchange for payment. The Employment Act of 2007 defines a child in Kenya as a person below the age of 18 years. The Act in Section 56 makes it illegal to employ a child below the age of 13. The Children Act No.8 of 2001 in S10 provides that every child is to be protected from economic exploitation, any work that interferes with their education or is harmful to their health or development and recruitment to hostilities and armed conflict. In fact Section 64 declares an offence for any person who employs, engages or uses a child in an industrial undertaking and sets a maximum fine of Kshs 200,000 or one year imprisonment or both.

Nonetheless, this does not take away from the fact that the state of living of some children dictates that they take up employment for the sake of their own livelihood and that if their families. With that in mind, several organizations work with the aim of assisting such children and protecting them from exploitation such as the Action for Children Economic Empowerment Programme for working children which is dedicated to giving members of the society the tools to support themselves economically. The organization focuses on children who are unable to go to secondary school and instead require employment to support their livelihood.

The scheme assists the children in acquiring apprenticeship training and giving the children vocational and life skills. In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, Kenya has witnessed massive economic decline. This as a result of measures taken by the government inspired by the need to curb the spread of the virus. The measures include social distancing orders, curfews and even partial lockdowns in some areas all of which directly affect grasroot businesses. This coupled with the substantive decline in numbers of customers frequenting the businesses births pressure on the owners of the establishments. This has largely dampened the organization’s efforts as they now face a shortage of options for placement of the children and also a number of the already working children having to forfeit work for their safety.

 The overhanging danger posed by this is disillusionment among the children who had hopes of a noble means to provide for their basic needs. Frustrated, they may resort to street life or crime to sustain them.

AfCiC provides a platform for working children within Thika sub-county to articulate their views about child labour via formation of a Thika Children Advisory Council (CAC) that recently presented their views about child labor at the 30th anniversary of  the United Nations Convention of Children Rights whose celebrations in Kenya were held at the Multimedia University and Kenyatta International Conference Council (KICC) in November 2019. In addition, the Thika Children Advisory Council presented its views for legislative consideration to the Thika Town constituency Member of Parliament Wainaina Wa Jungle in 2019. Alongside this,  the Thika Children Advisory Council has been instrumental in educating their peers about child labour and sensitizing them on the drawbacks of the same and measures that they can take to protect themselves.

Every year on 12th, the world celebrates World Day against Child Labour. The holiday was first launched in 2002 by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the aim of raising awareness and activism to prevent child labour.

Child Labour is defined as any situation where a child provides labour in exchange for payment. The Employment Act of 2007 defines a child in Kenya as a person below the age of 18 years. The Act in Section 56 makes it illegal to employ a child below the age of 13. The Children Act No.8 of 2001 in S10 provides that every child is to be protected from economic exploitation, any work that interferes with their education or is harmful to their health or development and recruitment to hostilities and armed conflict. In fact Section 64 declares an offence for any person who employs, engages or uses a child in an industrial undertaking and sets a maximum fine of Kshs 200,000 or one year imprisonment or both.

Nonetheless, this does not take away from the fact that the state of living of some children dictates that they take up employment for the sake of their own livelihood and that if their families. With that in mind, several organizations work with the aim of assisting such children and protecting them from exploitation such as the Action for Children Economic Empowerment Programme for working children which is dedicated to giving members of the society the tools to support themselves economically. The organization focuses on children who are unable to go to secondary school and instead require employment to support their livelihood.

The scheme assists the children in acquiring apprenticeship training and giving the children vocational and life skills. In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, Kenya has witnessed massive economic decline. This as a result of measures taken by the government inspired by the need to curb the spread of the virus. The measures include social distancing orders, curfews and even partial lockdowns in some areas all of which directly affect grasroot businesses. This coupled with the substantive decline in numbers of customers frequenting the businesses births pressure on the owners of the establishments. This has largely dampened the organization’s efforts as they now face a shortage of options for placement of the children and also a number of the already working children having to forfeit work for their safety.

 The overhanging danger posed by this is disillusionment among the children who had hopes of a noble means to provide for their basic needs. Frustrated, they may resort to street life or crime to sustain them.

Every year on 12th, the world celebrates World Day against Child Labour. The holiday was first launched in 2002 by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the aim of raising awareness and activism to prevent child labour.

Child Labour is defined as any situation where a child provides labour in exchange for payment. The Employment Act of 2007 defines a child in Kenya as a person below the age of 18 years. The Act in Section 56 makes it illegal to employ a child below the age of 13. The Children Act No.8 of 2001 in S10 provides that every child is to be protected from economic exploitation, any work that interferes with their education or is harmful to their health or development and recruitment to hostilities and armed conflict. In fact Section 64 declares an offence for any person who employs, engages or uses a child in an industrial undertaking and sets a maximum fine of Kshs 200,000 or one year imprisonment or both.

Nonetheless, this does not take away from the fact that the state of living of some children dictates that they take up employment for the sake of their own livelihood and that if their families. With that in mind, several organizations work with the aim of assisting such children and protecting them from exploitation such as the Action for Children Economic Empowerment Programme for working children which is dedicated to giving members of the society the tools to support themselves economically. The organization focuses on children who are unable to go to secondary school and instead require employment to support their livelihood.

The scheme assists the children in acquiring apprenticeship training and giving the children vocational and life skills. In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, Kenya has witnessed massive economic decline. This as a result of measures taken by the government inspired by the need to curb the spread of the virus. The measures include social distancing orders, curfews and even partial lockdowns in some areas all of which directly affect grasroot businesses. This coupled with the substantive decline in numbers of customers frequenting the businesses births pressure on the owners of the establishments. This has largely dampened the organization’s efforts as they now face a shortage of options for placement of the children and also a number of the already working children having to forfeit work for their safety.

 The overhanging danger posed by this is disillusionment among the children who had hopes of a noble means to provide for their basic needs. Frustrated, they may resort to street life or crime to sustain them.

AfCiC provides a platform for working children within Thika sub-county to articulate their views about child labour via formation of a Thika Children Advisory Council (CAC) that recently presented their views about child labor at the 30th anniversary of  the United Nations Convention of Children Rights whose celebrations in Kenya were held at the Multimedia University and Kenyatta International Conference Council (KICC) in November 2019. In addition, the Thika Children Advisory Council presented its views for legislative consideration to the Thika Town constituency Member of Parliament Wainaina Wa Jungle in 2019. Alongside this,  the Thika Children Advisory Council has been instrumental in educating their peers about child labour and sensitizing them on the drawbacks of the same and measures that they can take to protect themselves.

Every year on 12th, the world celebrates World Day against Child Labour. The holiday was first launched in 2002 by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the aim of raising awareness and activism to prevent child labour.

Child Labour is defined as any situation where a child provides labour in exchange for payment. The Employment Act of 2007 defines a child in Kenya as a person below the age of 18 years. The Act in Section 56 makes it illegal to employ a child below the age of 13. The Children Act No.8 of 2001 in S10 provides that every child is to be protected from economic exploitation, any work that interferes with their education or is harmful to their health or development and recruitment to hostilities and armed conflict. In fact Section 64 declares an offence for any person who employs, engages or uses a child in an industrial undertaking and sets a maximum fine of Kshs 200,000 or one year imprisonment or both.

Nonetheless, this does not take away from the fact that the state of living of some children dictates that they take up employment for the sake of their own livelihood and that if their families. With that in mind, several organizations work with the aim of assisting such children and protecting them from exploitation such as the Action for Children Economic Empowerment Programme for working children which is dedicated to giving members of the society the tools to support themselves economically. The organization focuses on children who are unable to go to secondary school and instead require employment to support their livelihood.

The scheme assists the children in acquiring apprenticeship training and giving the children vocational and life skills. In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, Kenya has witnessed massive economic decline. This as a result of measures taken by the government inspired by the need to curb the spread of the virus. The measures include social distancing orders, curfews and even partial lockdowns in some areas all of which directly affect grasroot businesses. This coupled with the substantive decline in numbers of customers frequenting the businesses births pressure on the owners of the establishments. This has largely dampened the organization’s efforts as they now face a shortage of options for placement of the children and also a number of the already working children having to forfeit work for their safety.

 The overhanging danger posed by this is disillusionment among the children who had hopes of a noble means to provide for their basic needs. Frustrated, they may resort to street life or crime to sustain them.

AfCiC provides a platform for working children within Thika sub-county to articulate their views about child labour via formation of a Thika Children Advisory Council (CAC) that recently presented their views about child labor at the 30th anniversary of  the United Nations Convention of Children Rights whose celebrations in Kenya were held at the Multimedia University and Kenyatta International Conference Council (KICC) in November 2019. In addition, the Thika Children Advisory Council presented its views for legislative consideration to the Thika Town constituency Member of Parliament Wainaina Wa Jungle in 2019. Alongside this,  the Thika Children Advisory Council has been instrumental in educating their peers about child labour and sensitizing them on the drawbacks of the same and measures that they can take to protect themselves.

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